Thinking Yogi

The intersection of two loves: yoga and writing.

Why child's pose matters

Posted by on in Health
  • Font size: Larger Smaller
  • Hits: 2879
  • 0 Comments
  • Subscribe to this entry



I used to be a bit of a yoga snob.

As a young, vigorous practitioner, I prided myself on being able to keep up with the most challenging sequences my teacher could throw at me. When rest was presented as an option, I most often declined and chose the harder pose variation instead. I viewed child's pose with something resembling disdain. To me it was either a throwaway that I waited out before moving on to a more exciting variation, or it was what I resorted to when I couldn't cut it, when I was too weak or too tired to do the 'real pose.'

At the time, I was an undergraduate at what I then considered peak physical condition and I had nothing but time on my hands to practice yoga, dance, and obsess over the healthiest brand of tofu at my local food co-op. Now 16 years later, I'm the mother of two young children, a business owner, a wife, and (as much as I can make the time) an individual with creative aspirations.

My practice has shifted a great deal over the past 16 years, and I'm currently enjoying moderation on my mat. More than any other time in my life, I'm balancing out my active practice with consistent gentle and restorative work. I feel stronger, healthier, and more relaxed than I have in years.

Even so, though most days I'm inspired on the mat, other times I notice myself slipping into boredom or complacency. The poses seem to lose their magic, and I wonder why they're not 'working' any more. If the pose is the same one I practiced the week before and it felt great then, what's different now?



Yoga poses serve as a structure into which to fit your physical, mental, and emotional self. They are shapes you return to in order to observe what's the same and what's different. They are touchstones that reveal how life is wearing on you.

I love how as a yoga practitioner you circle back to the same shapes, the same practices over and over again. Depending on the day or the month or the year, those same poses allow you the opportunity to find something delightfully different. But you have to pay attention.

Take child's pose, for example. At various points over the course of the past 16 years of practice, child's pose has felt entirely different to me. It has gone from being a throwaway pose to a place to deeply experience the breath in my back body. Now as I move into child's pose I'm fascinated by the lengthening sensation in my lower back and the stretch in my shoulders. I savor the nurturing feeling of folding inward into such a simple, humble shape. To look at my experience of child's pose from one year to the next is to look at the changing nature of my mind, body, and breath.

Yoga practice teaches you to be more observant, to be more aware as you explore what is new in your body during your time on the mat. This keen observation is a wonderful skill to practice, but it's not the end goal.

What good would it be if you were totally aware and fully present in child's pose or down dog or tree pose, but then when you came home from class you snapped at your loved ones for having left dirty dishes in the sink?

Once you have practiced observing how these shapes affect your state of being over and over on your mat, once you have trained your mind to pay attention in the 1000th downward facing dog you have done this year so you can notice how this particular pose on this particular day is different rather than going on autopilot, you are better equipped to do it off the mat.

When you say hello to the person behind the grocery checkout counter, maybe you'll really look him in the eyes. When a friend asks you how you're doing, you may genuinely respond and connect with her to find out how she is instead of just going through the motions.



It's been 8 years since we opened our doors at Bloom. Each November since we've opened, I reminisce about how things have changed from those early days and how they have stayed the same.

Though many things have changed, our core mission is still the same and drives every decision I make at Bloom. I'm passionate abut inspiring people to find greater health and happiness on a daily basis, and I'm always exploring new ways we can help our students do just that. Bloom continues to be a welcoming community that makes the rich tradition of yoga accessible to those who are looking for a fun, clear, down-to-earth way to integrate it into their daily life.

When I think about the many child's poses that have been practiced in our studios over the past 8 years, and I share a smile or a hug with one of the many practitioners of said pose and hear about the happiness or sadness in their life in this moment, and I recollect the joys and sorrows of last year and the year before and so on, I know that it's all the same and it's all different.

And through it all child's pose remains.

Kerry is the Founder & Director of Bloom Yoga Studio, voted Best Yoga Studio in the Chicago Reader, Chicago Magazine, and Citysearch. As a practicing yogi, writer, and mother of three, Kerry is all about making the principles and philosophies of yoga real and accessible for day-to-day living. You can find Kerry on Google+.

Comments